‘Honoured and privileged’
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Premier's award

‘Honoured and privileged’

'I've dedicated my life to ensuring no one else has to suffer like my mother and I feel incredibly honoured and privileged to have been recognised'

Professor Anatoly Rozenfeld.
Professor Anatoly Rozenfeld.

JEWISH professor Anatoly Rozenfeld has been recognised for his significant contributions to the field of cancer care and research in NSW.

Rozenfeld received the NSW Premier’s Award for Outstanding Cancer Researcher of the Year, with NSW Premier Dominic Perrottet thanking him for his dedication.

“Professor Rozenfeld is internationally renowned for his work to improve radiation treatments for cancer, with his discoveries helping change the face of cancer treatment globally over the last 30 years,” Perrottet said.

“I’d like to congratulate him on his achievements and thank him for his dedication to cancer research and care which has helped provide safer and more effective treatment options for the people of NSW.”

Rozenfeld’s decision to channel his knowledge of nuclear physics to help improve cancer treatment is a personal one, as his mother died of a brain tumour when he was just 10.

“She was 34 at the time and she was a medical doctor herself,” Rozenfeld said.

“In the 1960s in Ukraine, there was no advanced radiation imaging for cancer diagnostic and medical treatment for cancer.

“I’ve dedicated my life to ensuring no one else has to suffer like my mother and I feel incredibly honoured and privileged to have been recognised by the cancer community with this award.”

NSW Chief Cancer Officer and CEO of the Cancer Institute NSW, Professor Tracey O’Brien, said the NSW Premier’s Awards for Outstanding Cancer Research are an opportunity to recognise excellence.

“NSW has the best cancer survival rates in the world,” O’Brien said.

“Our excellence in cancer research is a key reason for these outstanding outcomes. The incredible work of dedicated researchers like Professor Rozenfeld is vital to helping prevent and treat cancers, as well as lessen the impact of the disease on patients and their loved ones.”

Each winner received funding boosts as part of their prize, with Rozenfeld receiving $50,000 to further his cancer research.

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