Sydney Jewish Museum to receive $6m from NSW govt
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Sydney Jewish Museum to receive $6m from NSW govt

"This expansion of the Sydney Jewish Museum will provide a vital link to ensure the Holocaust is always remembered by future generations."

A Sephardi Torah on display at the
SJM.
A Sephardi Torah on display at the SJM.

Thousands more NSW school students will have the opportunity to learn about the history of the Holocaust and the stories of its victims and survivors with a new education building, exhibition space and expanded archives to be built at the Sydney Jewish Museum (SJM).

The SJM – which receives around 60,000 visitors every year, half of which are students – will benefit from a $6.25 million NSW government contribution for the museum’s expansion.

Treasurer Dominic Perrottet said the state government assistance will help the museum ensure schools across the state are educated on the history of the Holocaust.

“As we come closer to a time when Holocaust survivors will no longer be able to share their stories, this expansion of the Sydney Jewish Museum will provide a vital link to ensure the Holocaust is always remembered by future generations,” Perrottet said.

“This funding will help preserve the history of the Holocaust and keep alive the memory of victims and survivors, allowing more visitors through a state-of-the-art facility to learn about the history of the Holocaust.”

The $6.25 million includes $3.5 million for a new three-storey education building for students with curriculum-linked studies and $2.75 million for temporary exhibition spaces and archives, raising the capacity from 250 students per day to more than 300.

New exhibition galleries will feature video testimonies of survivors, flexible learning spaces will cater for students of varied ages and ability, a reflective room will provide a space for visitors to process the experience and dedicated sound studios will help expand education to rural and remote schools.

“Currently less than 10 per cent of the museum’s collection is on display and visitors are limited. This upgrade will see additional artefacts currently sitting in the archives brought out on display to educate more visitors and students on the lessons of the Holocaust for years to come,” Perrottet said.

Further coverage in this week’s AJN, out Thursday.

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