search
From Sirens to Vigils

‘I went to Israel for a wedding and got a war’

“I had never experienced anything like that before, a situation where the terrorists were launching multiple rockets almost at the same time," says Danny Gluck.

Danny Gluck and his sister Linda Mosek at a vigil for hostages.
Danny Gluck and his sister Linda Mosek at a vigil for hostages.

In October 2023 Danny Gluck visited Hod HaSharon, a city in central Israel to attend the marriage of his niece.

At 6.30am on Saturday, October 7, his sister Dr Linda Mosek woke him saying they had to go into the safe room. “Then I noticed the warning sirens and knew this was the beginning of an attack”, he said. “We were a little bit out of the action. However, some rockets, debris and shrapnel fell in the area. I couldn’t believe I was actually in a war zone. It was an incredible experience full of emotions. There was fear, anxiety, trepidation, anger and frustration; it was an emotional roller coaster; that first day was just unbelievable.”

Israeli mobile phones have a warning alarm app that goes off five seconds before the main air raid. Sirens would then blare around the town.

“I had never experienced anything like that before, a situation where the terrorists were launching multiple rockets almost at the same time. If you can imagine the loudest sound, you’ve ever heard and multiply it by a factor of 10 or more that is the noise of the Israeli missiles intercepting and destroying the incoming rockets. It sends vibrations right through your body and buildings shake from the sonic boom. That went on for probably 10 days or more.”

Danny Gluck picking tomatoes
in Netivot.

During the many times Gluck drove to Tel Aviv to visit his son the phone app would go off and the instruction was to get out of the car, go to the side of the road, and stay near the concrete barrier on the freeway. In a suburban street, he had to run into an apartment block or a house, and people would share their shelter. After three weeks he said, “I just couldn’t bring myself to say to my family sorry guys too dangerous here, I’m going back to the safety of Australia. I ended up staying two months.” It was during that time that the cohesion of the Israeli community was noticeable.

“The nature of the fabric of the society and its camaraderie changed. Everybody was supporting the war effort as much as they could.”

There was an urgent call from farmers that their fruit needed picking. Gluck was one of 50 volunteers who picked tomatoes.

“We picked five and a half tons; the farmers were so excited and thankful,” he said.

He and his family also attended a lot of vigils.

“We sat and met many of the hostage families; a very cathartic but draining experience and we took part in a big protest march in Tel Aviv.”

Israel has been traditionally acknowledged for its quality of aged care. Gluck’s parents live at Emmy Monash in Melbourne where he usually visits them daily.

“When I see the level of care my parents receive at Emmy Monash, I know it is equal to that offered in Israel. I missed them while I was away, and they were worried about my situation, so I knew it was time to go home.”

read more:
comments