Wolper’s wellbeing grants
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Wolper’s wellbeing grants

Healthy doses of funding will go to six organisations committed to boosting community wellbeing, thanks to the Wolper Jewish Hospital Health Foundation.

Welcome funding: Hatzolah responder Daniel Balkin, Hatzolah NSW president Rabbi Mendy Litzman, Wolper Jewish Hospital Health Foundation chairman Daniel Goulburn and Hatzolah responders Tzvi Eliezer Berman and Rabbi Yehuda Niasoff.
Welcome funding: Hatzolah responder Daniel Balkin, Hatzolah NSW president Rabbi Mendy Litzman, Wolper Jewish Hospital Health Foundation chairman Daniel Goulburn and Hatzolah responders Tzvi Eliezer Berman and Rabbi Yehuda Niasoff.

HEALTHY doses of funding will go to six organisations committed to boosting community wellbeing, thanks to the Wolper Jewish Hospital Health Foundation (WJHHF).

Chairman Daniel Goulburn announced the recipients of the next round of grants last week, noting their work complements the foundation’s mission of supporting initiatives that deliver clear health benefits to the Jewish community and beyond.

“It’s a great pleasure to provide new support to the Caretakers Cottage and Jewish Alliance Against Family Violence (JAAFV) in their great work in the areas of youth homelessness and family violence,” Goulburn said.

“We also made a new grant to Maccabi NSW to fund first-aid training and kits for their sporting teams.

“The Wolper Foundation continues its support of Friends of Refugees of Eastern Europe and NCJWA NSW’s Mum for Mum program (through extended funding), to benefit the elderly and new mothers.

“And our longstanding support of Hatzolah continues – a lifesaving first responder service.”

Hatzolah NSW president Rabbi Mendy Litzman told The AJN that, as Hatzolah is a volunteer-run organisation that relies on donations, the grant is greatly appreciated.

It will be used to maintain service levels in the face of a sharp increase in medical emergency call volumes and to train six new first responders

and two call takers to cope with demand.

“We went from responding to between one and three call-outs per week to between three and eight per week,” Litzman said.

“Today, for example, we had five emergency call-outs ranging from a 15-month-old baby to a 94-year-old woman with chest pains.

“As the community gets older and people are living longer, demand for our service increases.

“We are also very proud to respond to Triple Zero call-outs whenever the Ambulance Service of NSW asks us to,” Litzman said.

Maccabi NSW general manager Daniel Kresner said by using the new grant to better equip coaches and managers to respond to incidents of injury during training sessions or matches, “it’s going to provide more peace of mind for our players and their family members”.

“Maccabi is thrilled and considers itself very fortunate to receive this grant,” Kresner said.

New grants will also assist the Bondi-based Caretakers Cottage to run an art therapy program for homeless kids, and JAAFV to provide specialised training to professionals working with male perpetrators of domestic violence in order to change their behaviours.

SHANE DESIATNIK

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